SPOTLIGHT

In conversation with

Joshua Singh

January 2023

“I try to convey some kind of emotion
in my photos; I think I fall somewhere
between a street photographer
and a cinematographer.”

Joshua is a photographer based in San Fransisco, California.

Á: Tell us a little bit about yourself. 

JS: I’m a hobbyist photographer. I grew up in Calcutta, India and moved around the country to study and work. In 2017, I moved to San Francisco. I’ve been shooting digital and film photography since the pandemic began. Besides photography, I love my morning coffee and watching football (soccer).

Á: Can you tell us more about your style of photography?

JS: I try to convey some kind of emotion in my photos of everyday life or a planned scene with a friend. I think I fall somewhere between a street style photographer and a cinematographer.

Á: How long have you been taking photographs for?

JS: I’ve been taking pictures since I was a kid. My earliest memory is using my parents’ point and shoot Yashica. However, I got into photography more seriously as a hobby during the early days of the pandemic, primarily with digital. I have only recently been shooting with film and I am loving it.

I’m mostly self-taught with a lot of help from YouTube tutorials. I’ve also had some great mentors who have helped me improve my shooting techniques.

Á: Why did you move from shooting digital to shooting on film? 

JS: There is something beautiful about analog photography which is very hard to replicate with digital. You have to be more intentional while shooting analog – that is something that I’ve really enjoyed and started to appreciate a lot more recently. 

Á: What do you enjoy most about photography?

JS: I enjoy the process a lot. Going out, looking for interesting compositions, capturing them and then processing them. I try to shoot daily and have been doing that with a fair amount of consistency the past couple of years. It’s hard to plan a specific shot on most days but I try to capture the “mood” of a specific scene. There are days you can go shooting and come back with nothing interesting, which is normal and fine. The process is the most rewarding.

Á: What would you consider to be the biggest influence on your work? 

JS: I love chasing the fog, especially when it’s at ground level. Fog gives the image an element of mystery and just adds a new dimension to any otherwise regular scene. This summer, for example, I spent several evenings in San Francisco’s Twin Peaks neighborhood trying to capture daily moments as they happen. 

Á: What tips would you give to someone who wants to start shooting?

JS: My simplest advice is to get out and shoot daily – that is the only way you will improve over time. The more time you spend outdoors and/or indoors shooting, the better you will get. Be patient and you will find the whole process deeply rewarding.

For resources, I would recommend checking out some popular YouTube channels including grainydays. I would also recommend looking at composition techniques used by an artist that you like. For example, I have been recently obsessed with Edward Hopper’s work and tend to draw inspiration from his style.

Á: Who are the photographers that you look up to the most?

JS: There are tons of photographers I really admire, a couple of names that come to mind are @johnnyhomemovies, @sanghan_, @foggygrain etc.

Á: How do you decide what to share on Instagram?

JS: I try to shoot every other day and there are many days when I don’t get something interesting enough to share. For me, the criteria is quite simple – the image should make me feel something. If it doesn’t, then I’m most probably not going to post it on Instagram. I don’t always get it right though, but I’m still learning. Shooting and posting on Instagram has been a positive experience for me – I’ve made a ton of similar minded friends who I go to shoot and consult with. I’m grateful for these friends and connections!

Á: What is the biggest lesson you have learned from your work so far?  

JS: I think the biggest lesson is that patience is key. Also, if you want to get better at something, it takes time and patience and the learning curve is never-ending.

Á: What creative project are you working on at the moment?

JS: I’m currently in India and have been trying to document everyday life here. I’m nervous and excited to have my film rolls developed!

You can find more of Joshua’s work here.

Interview by Mary Ojidu

In conversation with

Joshua Singh

January 2023

“I try to convey some kind
of emotion in my photos;
I think 
I fall somewhere
between a street photographer and a cinematographer.”

Joshua is a photographer based in San Fransisco, California.

Á: Tell us a little bit about yourself. 

JS: I’m a hobbyist photographer. I grew up in Calcutta, India and moved around the country to study and work. In 2017, I moved to San Francisco. I’ve been shooting digital and film photography since the pandemic began. Besides photography, I love my morning coffee and watching football (soccer).

Á: Can you tell us more about your style of photography?

JS: I try to convey some kind of emotion in my photos of everyday life or a planned scene with a friend. I think I fall somewhere between a street style photographer and a cinematographer.

Á: How long have you been taking photographs for?

JS: I’ve been taking pictures since I was a kid. My earliest memory is using my parents’ point and shoot Yashica. However, I got into photography more seriously as a hobby during the early days of the pandemic, primarily with digital. I have only recently been shooting with film and I am loving it.

I’m mostly self-taught with a lot of help from YouTube tutorials. I’ve also had some great mentors who have helped me improve my shooting techniques.

Á: Why did you move from shooting digital to shooting on film? 

JS: There is something beautiful about analog photography which is very hard to replicate with digital. You have to be more intentional while shooting analog – that is something that I’ve really enjoyed and started to appreciate a lot more recently. 

Á: What do you enjoy most about photography?

JS: I enjoy the process a lot. Going out, looking for interesting compositions, capturing them and then processing them. I try to shoot daily and have been doing that with a fair amount of consistency the past couple of years. It’s hard to plan a specific shot on most days but I try to capture the “mood” of a specific scene. There are days you can go shooting and come back with nothing interesting, which is normal and fine. The process is the most rewarding.

Á: What would you consider to be the biggest influence on your work? 

JS: I love chasing the fog, especially when it’s at ground level. Fog gives the image an element of mystery and just adds a new dimension to any otherwise regular scene. This summer, for example, I spent several evenings in San Francisco’s Twin Peaks neighborhood trying to capture daily moments as they happen. 

Á: What tips would you give to someone who wants to start shooting?

JS: My simplest advice is to get out and shoot daily – that is the only way you will improve over time. The more time you spend outdoors and/or indoors shooting, the better you will get. Be patient and you will find the whole process deeply rewarding.

For resources, I would recommend checking out some popular YouTube channels including grainydays. I would also recommend looking at composition techniques used by an artist that you like. For example, I have been recently obsessed with Edward Hopper’s work and tend to draw inspiration from his style.

Á: Who are the photographers that you look up to the most?

JS: There are tons of photographers I really admire, a couple of names that come to mind are @johnnyhomemovies, @sanghan_, @foggygrain etc.

Á: How do you decide what to share on Instagram?

JS: I try to shoot every other day and there are many days when I don’t get something interesting enough to share. For me, the criteria is quite simple – the image should make me feel something. If it doesn’t, then I’m most probably not going to post it on Instagram. I don’t always get it right though, but I’m still learning. Shooting and posting on Instagram has been a positive experience for me – I’ve made a ton of similar minded friends who I go to shoot and consult with. I’m grateful for these friends and connections!

Á: What is the biggest lesson you have learned from your work so far?  

JS: I think the biggest lesson is that patience is key. Also, if you want to get better at something, it takes time and patience and the learning curve is never-ending.

Á: What creative project are you working on at the moment?

JS: I’m currently in India and have been trying to document everyday life here. I’m nervous and excited to have my film rolls developed!

You can find more of Joshua’s work here.

Interview by Mary Ojidu

© AJIFA Limited 2022-2023

© AJIFA Limited 2022-2023